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How To Stop Suffering From Constipation

By Bill Case | In General Health, Nutrition | on February 1, 2013

The most important thing to remember is that “Constipation is not a sickness, or illness or disease. It is a symptom of something we do (or don’t do)”. Constipation is generalized as a condition where bowel movements are infrequent, resulting in a hard, dry stool. Many experts suggest that you should have at least 1 bowel movement each day, and some even suggest you should have a bowel movement for every meal!

The causes of constipation are many and varied, but the most common ones are: (i) a low-fiber diet (ii) insufficient fluids (iii) lack of exercise, and (iv) unhealthy colon. When you read through this list of common causes, the solution to constipation should smack you right in the face, and get you thinking about your diet, exercise and your outlook on life. If it doesn’t, you need to read on.

Here’s some little known facts. The colon (or large intestine) measures approx 1.5m (5 feet), and it is primarily responsible for storing waste, reclaiming water and some vitamins, and then converting wastes in feces. Most importantly, while the waste is travelling through the colon, the body will also absorb unwanted toxins. That is if your digestive system is working slowly. If your digestive system is working properly, the waste spends less time in your colon, and there is less chance of toxins being absorbed.

Constipation should never be ignored, because when the body is not functioning correctly, serious illness can ensue. In fact, a recent study into regularity of Bowel Movements in Japanese men and women suggests those with more frequent bowel movements had the lowest risk of developing colorectal and colon cancer. When you consider the fact that most people will have between 5-40 lbs of fecal matter in their colon (large intestine) at any given point in time, and that the fecal matter is rotting waste that is leeching toxins back into the body, is it any wonder that illness can ensue ?

So let’s address the common causes of constipation, and illustrate how some simple changes can relieve you of such a debilitating condition…..

DIET : changes in your dietary habits might just be the cure for your constipation. A typical diet for constipation would see the introduction of more fiber (especially in fruits, vegetables and whole grains), with restrictions on the consumption of fatty foods and sugar. Fibre is the key, and we don’t consume enough. Seriously, most Americans do not eat enough fiber on a daily basis – the American Dietetic Association recommends around 20 to 35 grams per day, most Americans consume only around 5-15 grams. The importance of fiber can only be appreciated by understanding how fibre works in the digestive process. Fiber actually travels right through the digestive process without being absorbed into the body. It actually absorbs water and becomes gel-like, hence making your stool/feces softer. In a low-fiber diet, the intestines actually draw nearly all of the water out of the stool, which becomes rock-hard and difficult to pass.

FLUIDS : the importance of water cannot be stressed enough. Our bodies consist of around 50% water, and this needs to be replenished daily to assist in flushing toxins out of the body and assisting the digestive system. 60-70 ounces of water and/or juices is recommended to be taken each day to assist is making bowel movements softer and more regular, and to help flush the colon at the same time. Many people believe that consuming copious amount of caffeine beverages such as tea and coffee help, but they in fact have a dehydrating effect rather than a hydrating effect.

EXERCISE : Our lack of exercise is another cause of constipation. We would much rather drive our cars to the corner store to buy milk than walk there, and our children are spending more an more time playing video games and watching TV. There is no precise explanation of why constipation is caused by laziness, but the lack of exercise works to slow our metabolism and in turn can be seen as a factor in slowing the digestive system and reducing the regularity of bowel movements

COLON HEALTH : as mentioned above, the colon plays such a big role in the digestive process and in constipation. A clogged or unhealthy colon can cause constipation by slowing the flow of fecal matter through the digestive process. The colon (large intestine) is that largest part of our digestive system, and adults on average have between 6-40lbs of fecal matter in the colon at any given point in time (10-20lbs of which can be compacted, and very hard to flush out). Having a large volume of such matter in your colon is not healthy, and a simple colon cleanse with a product like OxyPowder can assist in unclogging the colon, ridding it of the bad bacteria, and hence allowing a smoother passage for fecal matter to flow regularly.

Again, constipation is not a sickness, or illness or disease. It is a symptom of something we do (or don’t do). Constipation sufferers invariably display habits associated with poor diet (consisting of low fiber foods, and foods that are high in sugar and fat), not enough consumption of water, lack of exercise and stress. These symptoms typically lead these sufferers to opt for laxatives to help the regularity, but these people will do nothing to curb the problem at the source, leading to more severe constipation and a harder pathway back to normality.

Simple changes to lifestyle and eating habits are the key.

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-Physical Therapist 32 yrs. with 19 years in private practice -University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston,TX. - Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy- 1982 -Post graduate Sports Physical Therapy Specialist --1987 -Inventor: Diagonal Rotary Patterning Machine, Patent 1988 -Lecture: on orthopedic injuries-nationally and internationally -Co-author: for SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY -Writer: for The Physician and Sportsmedicine, Self, Men's Health, Fitness and Prevention magazines

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46 Comments to "How To Stop Suffering From Constipation"

  • Fit4living says:

    January 10, 2014 at 12:45 am -

    This is such an important topic, especially in this day and age. We seem to be exercising less and eating more processed foods as a society, than we have in any past time period. My grandmother died of colon cancer, and I try to be as careful as I can about following all the points listed in this piece. I don’t always achieve that goal, but I’m glad to at least be mindful and aware of these things. It’s so important to listen to the signs our bodies are giving us, before it’s too late!

  • Cosmic Debris says:

    January 16, 2014 at 10:39 pm -

    Of all the causes for constipation, medications are often ignored. Seniors suffering from chronic pain syndrome and taking opioid medications suffer the most. Unfortunately, using laxatives can make things worse.

    My doctor suggested using stool softeners, instead of stimulant laxatives. Magnesium supplements can also help move softened stool out of the body.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:08 am -

    Constipation occurs when the muscle contractions in your intestines are too slow to push the stool out of your body, or when there isn’t enough water in your stool to soften it and move it through your intestines. There are a number of things you can do to relieve your constipation, from adjusting your diet to trying a few over-the-counter medications. If you want to know how to relieve constipation and stop feeling uncomfortable

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:09 am -

    Change your diet
    Add more fiber-rich foods to your diet. Fiber-rich foods are known to help stimulate your bowels. Unfortunately, these foods, such as many fruits and vegetables, often get overlooked in a person’s daily diet. Don’t think of veggies or fruits as optional side dishes, but as crucial parts of every balanced meal. Not only will these foods relieve constipation, but they will also promote digestive health by improving your diet. You should aim for at least 24-38 grams of fiber a day. Here are some foods to add to your diet:[1]
    Avocado, split peas, broccoli, kale, green peas, and lentils
    Bran cereal, oatmeal, brown rice, and flax seeds
    Black beans, kidney beans, lima beans, navy beans, pinto beans, and soybeans
    Raspberries, blackberries, and strawberries, blueberries, and oranges
    Cabbage and cauliflower
    Almonds, dried figs, and olives
    Papaya and peaches

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:10 am -

    Increase the intensity of fiber. If adding a few fiber-rich foods to your diet doesn’t improve your problem, you can try a three-day fast of a high-fiber vegetable, or substituting one or two of your meals for foods that are entirely fiber-rich. This is not a good long-term solution because a balanced diet does require proteins and carbohydrates as well, but the three-day method can work in a pinch.

    Cabbage is particularly good because it’s not only high in fiber, but it has enzymes which encourage the entire digestive tract to “flush.” This is also a good liver cleanse for a build-up of liver toxins.
    Cabbage can be prepared in a number of ways, including skillet frying, if the oil used is grape-seed oil or olive oil. You should vary your recipes so the three-day fast becomes enjoyable.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:11 am -

    Take a fiber supplement. Consider taking a fiber supplement even if you think you are able to get that much fiber from your daily meals. Though these supplements aren’t guaranteed to work, they have helped people relieve their constipation in some cases. Some processed or synthetic fibers such as Citrucel, Metamucil, or Perdiem can do the trick.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:11 am -

    Hydrate well. Constipation can also be caused by insufficient hydration. Generally drink a minimum of 33-66 ounces (1.5-2 liters) per day, or more depending on your size, the weather, or amount of exercise. Constipation results from a lack of liquid in your stools, and hydrating can help this problem.

    If you’re having a bout of constipation, increase your water consumption for 3-4 days, starting with a big glass in the morning and drinking regularly throughout the day.
    In general, you should be drinking at least 10 glasses of warm water daily. Water is one of the best liquids that wash waste and toxins out of the body.[3]
    Other drinks, such as juice and soda, cannot compare regardless of how healthy or natural they are, because they tend to contain excessive sugar that could actually exacerbate constipation.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:12 am -

    Add prunes or prune juice to your diet. Prunes are especially high in fiber and contain sorbitol, a stool-loosening sugar that naturally helps relieve constipation. Sorbitol is a mild colonic stimulant that helps reduce transit time of stool and thus decrease the risk of constipation.If you don’t like the wrinkly texture or unique taste of prunes, prune juice may be a more palatable alternative. Prunes are more effective for relieving constipation than prune juice. Prunes have 14.7g of sorbitol per 100g, whereas prune juice has 6.1g per 100g. You will have to drink more prune juice to achieve the same health benefits because the prunes are processed, and you will have to take in additional sugars.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:12 am -

    Try the banana cure for mild constipation. This requires that you eat a banana with a glass of warm milk, chewing the banana carefully. Make sure that the banana is very ripe, not unripe, or it can have the opposite effect.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:13 am -

    Avoid foods that cause constipation. Constipation results from over consumption of fats, refined sugar, and dairy in comparison to fiber from whole grains, bran, fruits and vegetables. Avoid foods that are high in sugar, like candy or cookies, as well as too much cheese, white bread, white rice, and hard boiled eggs. You don’t have to cut these foods out of your diet completely, but you should cut down on these foods if you’re having trouble evacuating your bowels. Here are some other foods to avoid

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:14 am -

    Avoid caffeine. Though caffeine can help you relieve your bowels as a quick fix, a long-term use of caffeine can actually cause dehydration and exacerbate your problem.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:14 am -

    Avoid alcohol. Like caffeine, alcohol can dehydrate you and make you more constipated. Limiting or stopping your intake of alcohol can help you relieve your bowels

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:17 am -

    Constipation is a common problem. It means either going to the toilet less often than usual to empty the bowels, or passing hard or painful poo (also called faeces, stools or motions). Constipation may be caused by not eating enough fibre, or not drinking enough fluids. It can also be a side-effect of certain medicines, or related to an underlying medical condition. In many cases, the cause is not clear. Laxatives are a group of medicines that can treat constipation. Ideally, laxatives should only be used for short periods of time until symptoms ease.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:18 am -

    Not eating enough fibre (roughage) is a common cause. The average person in the UK eats about 12 grams of fibre each day. But, 18 grams per day is recommended by the British Nutrition Foundation. Fibre is the part of plant food that is not digested. It remains in your gut. It adds bulk to the poo (faeces, stools or motions), and helps your bowels to work well. Foods high in fibre include: fruit, vegetables, cereals and wholemeal bread.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:18 am -

    Not drinking much may make constipation worse. Stools are usually soft and easily passed if you eat enough fibre, and drink enough fluid. However, some people need more fibre and/or fluid than others in order to avoid constipation.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:19 am -

    Some medicines can cause constipation as a side-effect. Examples are painkillers (particularly those with codeine, such as co-codamol, or very strong painkillers, such as morphine), some antacids, some antidepressants (including amitriptyline) and iron tablets, but there are many others. See the list of possible side-effects on the leaflet that comes with any medicine that you may be taking. Tell a doctor if you suspect a medicine is making you constipated. A change of medication may be possible.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:19 am -

    Various medical conditions can cause constipation. For example, an underactive thyroid, irritable bowel syndrome, some gut disorders, and conditions that cause poor mobility, particularly in the elderly.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:19 am -

    Pregnancy. About 1 in 5 pregnant women will become constipated. It is due to the hormonal changes of pregnancy that slow down the gut movements. In later pregnancy, it can simply be due to the baby taking up a lot of room in the tummy and the bowels being pushed to one side.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:20 am -

    Unknown cause (idiopathic)

    Some people have a good diet, drink a lot of fluid, do not have a disease or take any medication that can cause constipation, but still become constipated. Their bowels are said to be underactive. This is quite common and is sometimes called functional constipation or primary constipation. Most cases occur in women. This condition tends to start in childhood or in early adulthood, and persists throughout life

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:30 am -

    If regular constipation is a new symptom, and there is no apparent cause, such as a change in diet, lifestyle, or medication. This is known as a ‘change in bowel habit’ and should be investigated if it lasts for more than about six weeks.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:31 am -

    Fibre (roughage) is the part of plant food that is not digested. It stays in your gut and is passed in the poo (faeces, stools or motions). Fibre adds bulk and some softness to the stools. High-fibre foods include the following:

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:31 am -

    Although the effects of a high-fibre diet may be seen in a few days, it may take as long as four weeks. You may find that if you eat more fibre (or take fibre supplements – see below), you may have some bloating and wind at first. This is often temporary. As your gut becomes used to extra fibre, the bloating or wind tends to settle over a few weeks. Therefore, if you are not used to a high-fibre diet, it is best to increase the amount of fibre gradually.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:32 am -

    Note: have lots to drink when you eat a high-fibre diet or fibre supplements. Drink at least two litres (about 8-10 cups) per day. This is to prevent a blockage of the gut, which is a rare complication of eating a lot of fibre without adequate fluid. See below in the section ‘Bulk-forming laxatives’ for an explanation.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:32 am -

    Sorbitol

    Sorbitol is a naturally occurring sugar. It is not digested very well and draws water into the gut, which has an effect of softening the stools. In effect, it acts like a natural osmotic laxative (osmotic laxatives are explained later). So, you may wish to include some foods that contain sorbitol in your diet. Fruits (and their juices) that have a high sorbitol content include apples, apricots, gooseberries, grapes (and raisins), peaches, pears, plums, prunes, raspberries and strawberries. The concentration of sorbitol is about 5-10 times higher in dried fruit. Dried or semi-dried fruits make good snacks and are easily packed for transport – for example, in a packed lunch.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:33 am -

    Exercise regularly, if possible

    Keeping your body active helps to keep your gut moving. It is well known that disabled people, and bed-bound people (even if just temporarily whilst admitted to hospital) are more likely to get constipated.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:33 am -

    Toileting routines

    Do not ignore the feeling of needing the toilet. Some people suppress this feeling if they are busy. It may result in a backlog of stools which is difficult to pass later. When you go to the toilet, it should be unhurried, with enough time to ensure that you can empty your bowel.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:34 am -

    When mobility is limited – for example, in people who are frail or who have dementia – it is important for carers to see that they have sufficient help to get to the toilet at the time they need to go; also, that they have a regular, unhurried toilet routine, with privacy. As a rule, it is best to try going to the toilet first thing in the morning or about 30 minutes after a meal. This is because the movement (propulsion) of stools through the lower bowel is greatest in the mornings and after meals (due to the gastrocolic reflex).

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:34 am -

    Positioning on the toilet is also important, especially for elderly people with constipation. Western-style toilets actually make things more difficult – squatting is probably the best position in which to pass stools. Putting a small footstool under your feet is a simple way to change your toilet position to aid the passage of stools. Relax, lean forward and rest your elbows on your thighs. You should not strain and hold your breath to pass stools.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:35 am -

    Treatment with a laxative is needed only if the lifestyle measures above do not work well. It is still worth persisting with these methods, even if you end up needing to use laxatives.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:35 am -

    For short-term uncomplicated constipation, you may even choose to treat yourself (without visiting the GP), by buying laxatives in the pharmacy or supermarket. In short-term constipation, laxatives can be stopped once the poo (faeces, stools or motions) becomes soft and easily passed again. You should probably visit your GP if you are struggling to manage short-term constipation yourself, or if you have longer-term (chronic, or persistent) constipation. All the different types of laxative are available on prescription.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:36 am -

    Chronic (persistent) constipation can be more difficult to treat. Laxatives are usually needed for longer periods (sometimes even indefinitely) and they should not be stopped abruptly. Chronic constipation is sometimes complicated by a backlog of hard faeces building up in the bowel (faecal loading) or even partially blocking it (impaction). If loading and impaction occur they need to be treated first, often with much higher doses of laxatives. Then a normal maintenance dose of laxatives is used to keep the bowels moving.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:36 am -

    Bulk-forming laxatives

    Sometimes these are known as fibre supplements. These increase the bulk of your stools in a similar way to fibre. They can have some effect within 12-24 hours but their full effect may take several days to develop.

    Unprocessed bran is a cheap fibre supplement. If you take bran, it is best to build up the amount gradually. Start with two teaspoons a day, and double the amount every five days until you reach about about 1-3 tablespoons per day. You can sprinkle bran on breakfast cereals, or mix it with fruit juices, milk, stews, soups, crumbles, pastries, scones, etc.
    Other fibre supplements include ispaghula (psyllium), methylcellulose, sterculia, wheat dextrin, inulin fibre, and whole linseeds (soaked in water).

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:37 am -

    A note of caution: fibre and bulk-forming laxatives partly work by absorbing water (a bit like blotting paper). The combination of bulk-forming laxatives and fluid usually produces soft, bulky stools which should be easy to pass out. When you eat a high-fibre diet or take bulk-forming laxatives:

    You should have plenty to drink. At least two litres per day (8-10 cups). The stools may become dry and difficult to pass if you do not have enough to drink. Very rarely, lots of fibre or bulk-forming laxatives and not enough fluid can cause an obstruction in the gut.
    You may notice an increase in wind (flatulence) and tummy (abdominal) bloating. This is normal and tends to settle down after a few weeks as the gut becomes used to the increase in fibre (or bulk-forming laxative).

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:38 am -

    Occasionally, bulk-forming laxatives can make symptoms worse if you have very severe constipation. This is because they may cause abdominal bloating and discomfort without doing much to clear a lot of faeces which are stuck further down the gut. See a doctor if you feel that bulk-forming laxatives are making your symptoms worse.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:38 am -

    Stimulant laxatives

    These stimulate the nerves in the large bowel (the colon and rectum, sometimes also called the large intestine). This then causes the muscle in the wall of the large bowel to squeeze harder than usual. This pushes the stools along and out. Their effect is usually within 8-12 hours. A bedtime dose is recommended so you are likely to feel the urge to go to the toilet sometime the following morning. Stimulant laxative suppositories act more quickly (within 20-60 minutes). Possible side-effects from stimulant laxatives include abdominal cramps, and long-term use can lead to a bowel that is less active on its own (without laxatives). This can be thought of as a ‘lazy bowel’.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:39 am -

    Stimulant laxatives include bisacodyl, dantron, docusate, glycerol, senna and sodium picosulfate. These medicines can be prescribed on a prescription in the unbranded (generic) form. Commercially branded versions (proprietary brands) contain the same ingredients, but are generally only available for purchase over-the-counter. Examples include:

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:39 am -

    Faecal softeners

    These work by wetting and softening the faeces. The most commonly used is docusate sodium (which also has a weak stimulant action too). Bulk-forming laxatives also have some faecal-softening properties. Arachis (peanut) oil enemas are occasionally used to soften impacted faeces in the rectum (the lowest part of the colon, just before the back passage (anus)).

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:41 am -

    Are there any complications of long-term (chronic) constipation?

    Short-term constipation or intermittent bouts of constipation are unlikely to cause any long-term problems. Sometimes a split or tear in the anal skin (an anal fissure) can occur with the passage of particularly big or hard poo (faeces, stools or motions). This is very painful, and there may be a small amount of fresh red blood on the toilet paper. Treatment of an anal fissure involves lifestyle measures (mentioned earlier) to keep the stools soft, and perhaps laxatives too, to keep the stools really easy to pass. Local anaesthetic ointment or glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) ointment can be prescribed by your GP to ease the pain and help relax the muscles around the back passage (anus), to help the fissure to heal.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:42 am -

    Severe chronic constipation can result in faecal impaction. This is something that is more likely in the elderly and infirm. Basically, a large mass of hard faeces blocks the rectum. The mass is too big to pass and the rectum is stretched and enlarged, so the muscles within it don’t work so well to push faeces out. Sometimes people with this problem think that they have diarrhoea. This is because liquid faeces, from above the blockage, leak round the big lump of faeces, and out of the anus. This is known as overflow diarrhoea. In this situation, you may also have faecal incontinence – that is, you have no control over this liquid faeces leaking out. Faecal impaction with overflow diarrhoea is likely if you have been getting progressively more constipated, and then get liquid faeces, possibly explosive, and without much control. If a doctor or nurse examines the anus, the hard faeces can often be felt, confirming the diagnosis.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:44 am -

    Prunes (dried plums) have long been thought of as effective for constipation. However, up until recently, there had been little scientific proof of this. But, a research trial published in 2011 (cited at the end) lends support to the belief that prunes are good for treating constipation.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:46 am -

    The Beverley-Travis natural laxative mixture

    This recipe (detailed below) was studied in a research trial that involved older people in a care home. A treatment group was compared to a non-treatment group. The conclusion of the study stated that “the Beverley-Travis natural laxative mixture, given at a dosage of 2 tablespoons twice daily, is easy to use, cost-effective, and more effective than daily prescribed laxatives at producing normal bowel movements”. So, it may be worth a try.

  • Kas says:

    July 14, 2015 at 1:40 am -

    This topic is very near and dear to me because I was definitely that person having difficulties in this area. I thought I was doing most things correctly, but as I found myself more and more uncomfortable, I knew I had to make a major change. My change was eliminating red meat. Apparently, somewhere along the way, my body just was not breaking done red meat the way it once had. Eliminated the red meat and slowly but surely things started getting back on track and I have not looked back.

  • Angel says:

    July 28, 2015 at 3:50 am -

    There’s an emerging trend here to address constipation in seniors : hydration,fiber-rich foods, and exercise. I think this applies to any age group but of course, seniors are the ones always adrversely affected.
    Apart from the remedies cited here, a simple massage before breakfast which I learned in a seminar works for me. Starting from the lower right abdomen, massage with just the right pressure to the top portion of the stomach below the ribs all the way down to the lower left abdomen. It’s like an inverted U. Repeat this for at least 5 times. I suppose some therapists can recommend similar massages to stimulate the digestive function.

  • GemmaRowlands says:

    July 30, 2015 at 7:54 am -

    Whenever anybody comes to me saying that they have problems with their health, one of the first things that I will always ask them is whether they drink enough water, and if there is any way that they would be able to increase this. You would be amazed at just how much of a difference water can actually make. I think it is a good idea to make sure that you carry a bottle around with you at all times, as this means that you can enjoy sipping on it whilst knowing that it’s having a positive impact on your health.

  • Diane says:

    August 3, 2015 at 11:47 pm -

    I would definitely recommend a look at diet for anyone who experiences constipation. Rather than rushing to take laxatives, which may or may not help, and, in fact, may exacerbate the problem, it’s much more productive to examine the amount and types of foods the person eats and drinks, as well as his/her level of exercise. These are easy things to address, but it seems many these days would prefer to take a pill than engage in healthy dietary changes.

  • Celerian says:

    October 5, 2015 at 3:26 pm -

    I would recommend a good diet for people who have constipation, laxatives are silly in this situation and diet is much better

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