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A Healthy Holiday Gift for Aging Parents

By Bill Case | In Safety, Senior Exercise, Senior Fitness | on November 8, 2013

When we think of the holiday season, we usually think of family.  We remember the memories of mom and dad while growing up, as well as, our grandparents sharing stories and life reflections.   Now that this holiday season is around the corner, wouldn’t it be cool to do something different this year.  How about the gift of a healthier lifestyle that only you can provide.

Whether it is calling up mom or dad for a weekly walk or stopping by to exercise together, no other gift shouts love like time.  Visiting a loved one creates an atmosphere of connection and warmth, saying I’m glad we are together.

Keeping our older adult family active and healthy is an ongoing process.  Creating daily opportunities to stimulate the mind, body and emotions has proven to be a key to a happy life.  We strive to prevent all those unnecessary hardships and trials that come our way and sadly life doesn’t always give us the heads up. However, newsflash, now you can be proactive and create a healthy and safe lifestyle to your older adult with the gift that keeps on giving –your time.

An active lifestyle includes exercise and activities that keep the joints lubricated, the muscles active and the balance system in check.   Playing cards focuses on fine motor skills and board games stimulate memory.  Walking helps maintain an upright posture, as well as, reminds you to pick up your feet.  Also, one on one time, provides for discussion of canes, shoes, glasses and medications which all affect balance and stability.

Personally, when I visit my dad, I am able to walk through the home and check for safety features that go overlooked.  Checking the proper function of the thermostat, stove and oven can eliminate an unnecessary expense, as well as, make sure it’s safe.

Are there strategically placed grab bars in the bathroom?  Is all the clutter removed from the bed to the bathroom that may create a trip in the middle of the night?  Is there a rubber mat in the shower or bathtub?  Statistically, most home falls do occur in the bathroom.

Older adult falls are preventable.  Falling is not an inevitable result of aging.

However, falling is the number one cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries for people over 65 years of age.  Every 15 seconds a senior is seen in the emergency room for a fall-related injury.  Those who fall are two to three times more likely to fall again. Each week, there are more than 30,000 adults over the age of 65 that are seriously injured by falling.  Each week, nearly 250 older adults will die as a result.

This holiday season, let’s get out of our comfort zone, pick up the phone or just stop by and visit an older adult and say, “I was thinking about you.”  You can go for a walk, play a game or just assess the home environment for safety.  Your time will be rewarded and your touch remembered.  Most importantly, a window of opportunity will not open itself.

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-Physical Therapist 32 yrs. with 19 years in private practice -University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston,TX. - Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy- 1982 -Post graduate Sports Physical Therapy Specialist --1987 -Inventor: Diagonal Rotary Patterning Machine, Patent 1988 -Lecture: on orthopedic injuries-nationally and internationally -Co-author: for SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY -Writer: for The Physician and Sportsmedicine, Self, Men's Health, Fitness and Prevention magazines

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64 Comments to "A Healthy Holiday Gift for Aging Parents"

  • dieselfit says:

    November 9, 2013 at 4:35 pm -

    This is an amazing article. I agree that we should call our elderly every once in a while to check up on them. Keeping healthy as well as maintaining our mental and physical health is very important for a quality life style. Although a healthy lifestyle will allow us to live longer, it’s more appealing when we mention the quality as well.

    1. hydrlon says:

      November 22, 2013 at 9:11 pm -

      This is entirely true, without being in shape, you’re leaving yourself weak to falls.

    2. theshaynee says:

      January 16, 2014 at 7:01 pm -

      I also read somewhere that keeping your mind active will stimulate different chemicals and keep you healthy. In other words, an active brain boosts your immune system. This will prevent weakness and tons of illnesses.

  • Celeste says:

    November 14, 2013 at 6:43 pm -

    I could not agree more! I have actually done this with my mom, we visit her every few days and we make sure to go for walks even if it is just to the store up the block. Only thing that isn’t so great is when the weather gets too cold. I supposed bundling up can work just as good. Another great article, thanks.

    1. dieselfit says:

      November 22, 2013 at 5:26 am -

      That’s awesome that your mom does exercise. How does she feel after the walks? I mean some people can feel exhausted but if they feel good and relax it’s definitely a great sign!

  • JoanMcWench says:

    November 15, 2013 at 5:20 pm -

    There is nothing more valuable to a friend of loved one than time spent doing things with them. This travels across the board of age. When we are younger we interact more with people and the value of people around us can be greatly diminished. When you become older and find you have less contact with others (for whatever reason) the importance of that contact can beat out any fruitcake. Although, A LOT of things can beat out a fruitcake.

    1. theshaynee says:

      January 16, 2014 at 7:03 pm -

      Agreed. Most fruitcake is incredibly gross. I’ve only ever found one that was actually appetizing to me. My friend’s mom made it so it was fresh. Not like the packaged stuff.

  • rocketfish says:

    November 25, 2013 at 7:55 am -

    Having grab bars installed in the bathroom makes a great gift for seniors. Older parents are usually very hard to buy for – they already have everything the need, and how many shirts does dear old dad need? Grab bars is typically something that would be installed only after someone had an accident. Your post has prompted me to be proactive and have this done before it is too late. Thanks for this post!

  • charlee felice says:

    November 25, 2013 at 7:04 pm -

    This article is very positive and motivating. It is good to keep up with our elderly parents, and you have provided with some critical information, that we may oversee at times. Falls are serious matter, and preventable. Unfortunately, the statistics are alarming. It is a sad and bitter truth.

  • Fit4living says:

    November 30, 2013 at 8:16 pm -

    This is great information to consider. My dad just had a fall recently when he and mom were walking their dog. No major damage, but he did bruise his ribs, which takes time to heal and can be quite painful. My mom and I go for walks when we can, and if it’s too cold outside for us, we will go the local mall or health food outlet and walk several laps around those places. That’s a good way to get some exercise while also getting some necessary shopping done. My parents haven’t yet gotten to the point where they need safety bars installed in their home, but I’m glad I read this because it’s something to keep in mind for later. We also play games occasionally (Mom and I like them, but Dad does not like them as much as we do). Knowing that cards and board games help keep the mind sharp is a good incentive to pull them out more often and have some fun!

    1. Bill Case says:

      November 30, 2013 at 9:24 pm -

      I’m so glad that your parents haven’t had a fall at home. I recommend safety grab bars in the shower after 65 years of age —now they will be in place, if needed. Prevention is the key to avoiding a devastating slip and fall.

      1. Fit4living says:

        November 30, 2013 at 10:06 pm -

        You make a good point, Bill. Both of my parents, and I, for that matter, have fallen at various times. My mom and I tend to fall on our knees, and poor Dad has fallen twice on his ribs (once was a fall on a motorcycle – eek!). He’s an RN who is very near retirement age, so I think the concept of safety bars will make sense to him. I’ll suggest the idea to them in the near future – I think it’s a solid idea. Better to have the bars available, than to not have them when they’re needed.

    2. theshaynee says:

      January 16, 2014 at 7:16 pm -

      Board games are a great idea! But my grandparents have never played one I don’t think. And I’m not sure they would ever be interested in one. Cards, yes. They’ve played cards their whole lives I’m sure.
      Any advice on which games to start them off on? All I’m coming up with is Monopoly. Don’t think that’s a good one though.

  • Foxy says:

    December 10, 2013 at 2:46 am -

    The home has more fall risks that we can even imagine. Trying to catch them all seems nearly impossible, which is very stressful. Once you catch something you missed, get it fixed quick. I am glad this article talks about the bathroom. The shower can be a very dangerous place if it is not kept dry. When wet, bars must be in place for stability.

    1. Bill Case says:

      December 10, 2013 at 3:39 am -

      I recommend to everyone over the age of 65 years old to have shower and/or bath grab bars placed to catch a slip and prevent a fall. They do work!!

  • Breakfree says:

    December 30, 2013 at 1:12 am -

    Actually this is a sensitive problem and everybody can relate to it because they have at least fallen once in their bathrooms and it seriously can cause injuries or make you bedridden so I really fancy your suggestion. Also, it is quite thoughtful of you to also emphasize this in relation with the elder ages who are more exposed to these kind of things. Thank you.

  • theshaynee says:

    January 15, 2014 at 3:15 am -

    I had been wondering for a while about how to approach this with the seniors in my life. Especially the ones with diabetes and other illnesses that would benefit from activity. I am just always worried they might get defensive or that they would take it the wrong way. Sometimes it’s hard to hear things like that or consider those kinds of things gifts.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 16, 2014 at 7:42 pm -

    I remember when I was little trying to figure out a gift for my parents at Christmas. My mother used to to tell me that my grandmother didn’t want more stuff, but rather something from our heart. A picture, a sleepover (where she let me cheat at go-fish and eat chocolate chips) or some help around the yard.

    Now that my mother is a old and my siblings and I are getting older we concentrate on not giving more “stuff” at Christmas. We give gifts from the heart that don’t need dusting and won’t go out with the next batch of years. I think this is a nice way to keep our aging parents longer.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 16, 2014 at 8:34 pm -

    Finding the perfect gift is challenging under any circumstances but buying for an aging parent can be particularly difficult. Obviously you want to get them something they want but it really no longer makes sense for you to get them yet another doll for their doll collection or yet another tie because, hopefully at this point, they’re getting rid of stuff

  • elidbugg says:

    January 16, 2014 at 8:36 pm -

    Think in terms of what they really want but that they may not know they want.
    For example:
    Put old family movies onto DVDs for them – and give a copy to everyone else in the family, too. Just keep in mind that this process doesn’t happen over night so start NOW.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:56 pm -

    The holidays can provide a welcome opportunity to visit aging parents. Many of us are part of two-income families, have children, a busy work-day schedule, a tight budget and limited time off work. Maybe we live far away. For whatever reason, we do not see our parents as often as we would like to.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:57 pm -

    We look forward to the holidays and scheduled time to visit and celebrate traditional rituals with our parents. Memories of fun, frivolity and laughter can build our expectations. Finally, it’s a time to visit and enjoy our parents with extended family, good food, good company and much needed relaxation.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:57 pm -

    Holidays are a very special time. Yet, this can also be a time for startling realizations. We may find dramatic changes in our parents’ health, mobility or state of mind. These changes can be disarming emotionally. No matter how uncomfortable we may be feeling by these changes, chances are our parents are struggling more. Is this the time to open a dialogue with them? What questions can we ask to learn more about the setbacks we observe in our aging parents during our holiday visit?

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:58 pm -

    Are There Safety Issues?
    We can usually tell if they are using the rooms upstairs. Ask if they get dizzy or weary when they move up and down the stairs. Falls can often be prevented with secured railings and grab bars in the bathtub or shower.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:58 pm -

    Reduced Physical Activity
    A change in your parent’s appearance may represent a decline in their physical abilities. Inquire about their activity level. Is there a deep depression in the sofa located in front of the television set? Take a walk together before
    your holiday dinner and observe your parent’s sense of balance. Do they get easily fatigued?

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:59 pm -

    What Does the Doctor Say?
    If we start by offering information about our own experiences with doctors and medication, parents can be more forthcoming. We could ask when they visited their Doctor last. Which medications are they taking; how often?

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 4:59 pm -

    You Are What You Eat
    Good nutrition becomes increasingly important as we age, yet many older adults are dealing with vastly diminished taste buds which can result in the lack of desire to eat. Are there healthy and nutritious foods in the cupboards?

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:00 pm -

    Is their vision failing? They may be frustrated by the challenges of reading labels at the grocery store; are they shopping regularly? Is if the housekeeping up to par? If not, it’s not because they don’t care; they may not see the dirt. Impaired vision can have a dramatic effect on critical activities like driving a car. If not caught early enough the result can be a serious and life threatening accident.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:00 pm -

    Lifestyle
    If you feel that your parents are struggling to maintain their current lifestyle, you might introduce some ways to make incremental adjustments. It could be something as simple as a gradual downsizing process. Discuss the options.
    It’s OK to make it clear that you feel that now is the time to make some choices that will have a positive impact on their well-being. If you share your concerns lovingly; with respect you could say; “I want you to be safe and happy.”

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:01 pm -

    I Can Take Care of Myself
    Sometimes it is difficult for elderly parents to relinquish their role as the people who nurtures you and knows best what to do. It can be difficult for them to admit that they may need your attention. Maybe if we tell them what a great job they have done all these years. Affirm with them that they deserve a break you want to help them explore ways to make life easier.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:01 pm -

    The Greatest Gift
    The aging process can be pretty scary and lonely for your parents. The holidays could be the time to tune in to their needs and engage in open and productive dialogue. Together it’s possible to plan a strategy to start them on a new course for an easier lifestyle. This can be done in tandem with a sense of good humor, respect for their dignity and holiday fun. This may be the greatest gift you can give to your elderly parents this holiday season.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:09 pm -

    Have you ever agonized over what gift to give your mom or dad or elderly relative? If you’re like most of us, then the answer is: Yes. I remember so clearly wondering what to buy, so I put it off because I didn’t know—and Bob, (my former father-in-law who I cared for) already had everything, not to mention that he didn’t do much of anything, so what could I possibly give? I would give anything now if I had just one more birthday or holiday to shop for him. Sometimes lessons come to us when it’s too late.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:10 pm -

    I am here to tell you—it doesn’t matter. Stop agonizing and enjoy the process of giving a gift to someone you love. It doesn’t matter if your gift never gets used. It doesn’t matter if you don’t receive accolades for the gift. What matters is the giving. What matters is a beautifully wrapped gift which speaks LOVE.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:10 pm -

    Find a photo from your loved one’s past. Have it cleaned up and framed. Memories create happy moments.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:10 pm -

    Give a beautiful hankie to a grandmother.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:11 pm -

    Give a tie to grandpa. A tie says, “We’re going somewhere fancy one day soon.” Make sure you actually make arrangements for the tie to be worn. Follow through.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:11 pm -

    Give a music box with a favorite song. DVDs of movies from their past create hours of peaceful afternoons.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:12 pm -

    CDs of favorite music – or better yet, create a CD especially for your loved one with all his/her most loved music.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:12 pm -

    Make a basket of favorite treats or, better yet, have your children bake something special.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:12 pm -

    Holidays are critical in a senior’s life. Holidays conjure up all kinds of memories and can send someone into a downward spiral or, worse, into a deep depression if not handled with sensitivity.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:13 pm -

    Memories can be an especially sensitive issue. They have the ability to be wonderfully moving if the senior is encouraged to share memories and experiences. However, if the senior is made to feel like his/her memories don’t matter, a feeling of isolation can take over. Try not to let this happen. The more you can involve your loved one in holiday celebrations, the better.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:13 pm -

    When someone reaches true maturity, it’s not the things—it’s the thought. It’s the moments with the family. It’s the treasure of being with loved ones. The care giving journey allows you to create moments and memories that will be cherished. Creating moments is what our life is all about. Make them special.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:15 pm -

    Sometimes it’s hard to choose the right gift for you aging parent, grandparent or loved one. After all, they’ve had a lifetime of gifts and often have a different perspective on life than you may have. So what is the secret to success when shopping for the senior in your life? Do you go with practical or fun? Homemade or store-bought? Will your aging loved one even know what to do with the latest tech gift, like an iPad? Well you are the best person to judge your loved ones’ needs and desires, but here are some great holiday gift ideas to help get you started…

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:15 pm -

    Sometimes shopping for an elderly loved one can be challenging. If you are stumped for a gift idea for the elder in your life, here are some ideas—some old, some new—to help you find the gift recipe that brings a smile to your favorite senior’s face this holiday season.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:16 pm -

    Blankets or throws — While this may sound obvious, you can’t go wrong with a cozy blanket or throw—and there are so many custom options available these days! Whether you’re a talented quilter who can create a homemade masterpiece, or you prefer to customize with a heartfelt photo throw from Costco or Shutterfly—this is a gift option that will warm the soul along with the aging body

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:16 pm -

    Custom gift basket — Gift baskets add the personal touch to practical products. So whether you create a care basket that includes slippers with your loved ones’ favorite lotions, bath soaps, cologne or perfume, or would rather create a custom food basket of your loved ones favorite meats, cheeses chocolates or sauces; a gift basket balances practicality with custom personality and love.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:16 pm -

    Tablets and iPads — These all-in-one devices are in many ways tailored for seniors with their touch-screen technology and large print options. The social connection is important for elders, and you might be surprised how savvy your senior can be with a quick tutorial on both Kindle Fire and customizable iPads. Good for entertainment, medication management and brain-exercising fun, this impressive technology is an excellent option for aging loved one.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:17 pm -

    Kitchen and bath towels — Everyone can use new kitchen and bath towels as these daily items are such a necessity of the every day. Adding monogrammed initials or patterns that compliment the home or apartment will only enhance this gift.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:17 pm -

    Gift certificates to grocery stores and favorite dining venues — If your loved one is still independent, gift certificates to grocery stores and dining venues allows the senior to not only cut expenses grocery shopping, but also allows them an entertaining lunch or evening out for a special dining experience. This is also a great gift to help prevent senior malnutrition; an epidemic that many are unaware of in the aging population.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:17 pm -

    Smartphone — Phones are not only important for keeping the social connection—a necessary ingredient for quality of life—but also are crucial for senior safety. Many smartphones of today offer large buttons, photo speed dial, visual rings and more.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:18 pm -

    Clothes — While this may sound like a dull option, just think about it—when was the last time your senior loved one bought new clothes for him or herself? Chances are it has been years, especially with today’s recession and many seniors’ need to save money on a fixed income. Buying sweat pants, sweaters, underwear, socks or nice shirts and pants (whatever the senior in your life needs!) will assure a gift that won’t go unused.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:18 pm -

    Kitchens Essentials Set — For seniors who struggle with arthritis or limited hand strength, custom kitchen sets that cater to these conditions can make a perfect gift. OXO GOOD GRIPS Kitchen set and Arthritis Supplies both offer excellent, ergonomic options.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:19 pm -

    Health Management and Fitness Options — It’s important to stay fit in all seasons of life, but especially crucial for seniors to help prevent stroke, heart conditions and other common ailments that come with age. Meeting with a nutritionist, dietitian or naturopathic physician who specializes in senior health is an excellent idea to customize your loved ones’ health, nutrition and fitness plan. Often times these experts have excellent ideas to make food more enjoyable for seniors, helping to keep them both healthy and happy (learn more about senior nutrition).

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:20 pm -

    Finding the perfect Christmas gift for a grandchild can certainly make your spirits bright. But if you’re in the dark about what to give, the hunt can be more of a job than a joy.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:21 pm -

    What do you get the toddler who has more stuffed animals than Toys R Us? Or the teen with tastes as specific as they are mysterious? Do you dare buy your grandson that remote-controlled fire truck with siren, flashing lights and a hose that really squirts?

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:21 pm -

    The possibilities are endless and, at times, overwhelming. To lend some method to the holiday madness, here’s some advice from the Healthy Aging Partnership, a coalition of more than 35 Puget Sound-area organizations dedicated to the health and well-being of older adults.

  • elidbugg says:

    January 17, 2014 at 5:22 pm -

    It doesn’t hurt to ask. If your granddaughter hasn’t already told you (over and over again) what she wants, then ask her. Of course, before you rush out to buy that “dance-glam” face glitter or the latest Britney Spears CD, you’ll want to check with her parents to make sure they approve or hadn’t planned on giving her the same thing

  • oraclemay says:

    June 6, 2014 at 12:27 am -

    I think taking care of the elderly in our lives should be a priority. Afterall, we are all going to get there in time. I would like it if someone looked out for me when I am older and not quite so full of life . However, I am planning to remain active and healthy for a very long time.

  • kate86 says:

    June 10, 2014 at 2:21 am -

    This is a great article. Thanks for posting! I live with my elderly dad and am often finding jerry-rigged things in the house…something duct taped or ripped. Most of the time it’s ok as it is, but I do feel better being able to keep an eye on things, I’m not sure if he would tell me if he needed help with something, so it’s good to be able to help out when I can!

  • Diane says:

    July 24, 2015 at 11:13 pm -

    There are some great points in this article. I think nowadays, too many elderly are left alone, for whatever reason, and this is the point in their lives where they are most vulnerable, and need our help. My Mom lives across the country, so I don’t get to see her much, but we do talk for several hours each week, and I have siblings who live with and nearby her, so she is not alone. It’s important to remember that a little attention and care can go a long way, and they are usually well appreciated.

    Another thing to remember is that those who are taking care of and/or living with our elderly loved ones can also use our support. If you live nearby, stop in every so often, to give them a break. Especially if the elderly person is frail and needs constant attention, this can wear on the caregiver. It doesn’t hurt to bring a treat or two, not only for the elderly person him/herself, but also for the caregiver, particularly if s/he lives there, since s/he may not get out of the house much.

  • GemmaRowlands says:

    July 29, 2015 at 11:51 am -

    One of the things in this article that I think could possibly be the most helpful is the thought that we should be exercising with our elderly relatives, as it can help a lot for them to have company while they are exercising to keep themselves active. I know that motivation is a lot higher when this is the case, and it could even be used as more of a social activity than actual exercise, so it is certainly worth thinking about. A gym membership, or a pass for an exercise class, is always great to give as a gift, as it really can work to transform somebody’s life.

  • Tipes99 says:

    August 19, 2015 at 5:10 pm -

    I think a healthy mind will also help to get a healthy body. It really is an amazing connection. I think the most important things I got from this article is that, we shouldn’t neglect our elder. Especially when we have our own life and family. I think the article is a great start. Give your mom, dad, grandma, and grandpa a call. Enquirer how they are doing and make schedule to get together. I think my grandma is the happiest when we do activities together. 🙂

  • Amelie says:

    November 16, 2015 at 6:09 am -

    I’m saving up for a high-powered blender so I can make smoothies with superfoods in them. My cheap blender just doesn’t cut it – it leaves chunks of leaves that are sometimes literally hard to swallow. Haha! Plus I’m hoping that the creamier consistency will make the shake taste better. My mother’s arthritis started acting up again, so she’s hesitant to do anything more strenuous than gardening. 🙁 Maybe if I regularly make her smoothies with camu camu (supposed to help with inflammation), maca powder, and any other superfood I can get my hands on, she’ll eventually feel revitalized. Fingers crossed! 🙂

  • Alex_F says:

    December 12, 2015 at 4:14 pm -

    Having spent much of my college career working with older adults, I have been forced to look at mine and my parents’ own future in terms of their health. While I’m thankful that they’re both healthy for their age, there are still so many things in terms of fall prevention that I have to think about as time goes on, because a fall can be so detrimental. My father lost his mother due to a fall related injury. There are two facets to how we face this: prevent falls in the first place, and exercise to help prevent brittle bones. I’m going to definitely give the gift of activity in the coming years!

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